The 62nd International Short Film Festival Oberhausen was finished yesterday, where they gave out the awards in many different categories. Here are the winners:

Prizes awarded by the International Jury – Members: Andrés Denegri (Argentina), Stella Händler (Switzerland), Marta Kuzma (Sweden), Joanna Raczyńska (USA), Mika Taanila (Finland)

Grand Prize of the City of Oberhausen – 8,000 Euros

Venusia by Louise Carrin – Switzerland 2015, 34′

Venusia

Venusia

Statement:
A film that, by simple means in a single room, creates a whole universe. A static double portrait opens up to a dynamic landscape of the contemporary human condition.

Principal Prize – 4,000 Euros

Ang araw bago ang wakas (The day before the end) by Lav Diaz – Philippines 2015, 16′

Ang araw bago ang wakas

Ang araw bago ang wakas

Statement:
The Principal Prize is awarded to a work of political urgency. Otherwise canonical text arrives as a pressing vernacular, a site of last resort.

e-flux Prize – 3,000 Euros

Mains Propres (Washed Hands) by Louise Botkay – Brazil 2015, 8′

Washed Hands

Mains Propres

Statement:
A formally simple but complex film about filming and being filmed, which has a highly disturbing effect. The power of this work is built up through one of the more essential tools of cinema: framing.

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Special Mentions

Centre of the Cyclone by Heather Trawick – Canada/USA 2015, 18′, 16 mm

20 July.2015 by Deimantas Narkevičius – Lithuania 2016, 15 min. 8 sec., 3D DCP, colour

Jury of the Ministry for Family, Children, Youth, Culture and Sport of North Rhine-Westphalia – Members of the Jury: Peter Braatz (Ljubljana), Christiane Heuwinkel (Wolfsburg/Bielefeld), Maike Mia Höhne (Berlin/Hamburg), Markus Lenz (Cologne), Ulrike Sprenger (Constance)

1st Prize – 5,000 Euros

489 Years by Hayoun Kwon, France 2016, 11′

489 Years

489 Years

Statement:
The film 489 Years enters the demilitarized zone between North and South Korea and takes its audience into a forest of both life and death. Following the authentic memories of a border guard, the film uses images of fantastic quality to open the viewer’s eyes to a true but hidden reality of our world. We hear more than we see of both the cruelty and the beauty of this deadly fairytale forest, and yet the film gives us an almost physical sense of the existential powerlessness and fear felt in this completely mined area. The perfection in the depiction of this space is even heightened by a vision of the destruction of the border zone. If arms destroy arms and not people, the fear may dissolve in hope. A film of great depth, brilliant beauty and social relevance. For today and even more so for tomorrow.

2nd Prize – 3,000 Euros

If It Was by Laure Prouvost, Great Britain 2015, 9′

If It Was

If It Was

Statement:
Prouvost associates a utopia inspired exclusively by the place itself and its history with the sacred halls of art. In her film she opposes the reality of the historically charged Haus der Kunst in Munich and its overbearing national socialist architecture by a musée imaginaire that is as crazy as it is funny, sensual and definitely feminine. Overflowing with visual and thematic ideas, the film makes us hope that we may one day enter this museum of dreams.

The International Critics’ Prize (FIPRESCI Prize) – Members: Peter Kremski (Germany), Tina Poglajen (Slovenia), Shy K. Segev (Israel)

If It Was by Laure Prouvost, Great Britain 2015, 9′

Statement:
The FIPRESCI Jury awards the International Critics Prize to the British film If It Was by Laure Prouvost for its overwhelming cinematographic transition of a popular contemporary internet technique to the big screen, pushing it up into highly poetic dimensions and linking it with a profound essayistic reflection on the freedom of art. Daringly playing with images and language and constantly seducing the audience with its subversive charm, Laure Prouvost’s multi-media inspired film lines out in an aesthetically complex and accomplished manner that art knows no boundaries. In a style that is quite her own, Laure Prouvost sets out to create an impact on the audience that is intellectual as well as emotional.

Prize of the Ecumenical Jury – 1,500 Euros – Members: Christian Murer (Switzerland), Dagmar Petrick (Germany), Thomas Schüpbach (Switzerland), Eberhard Streier (Germany)

489 Years by Hayoun Kwon, France 2016, 11′

Statement:
In his memories a soldier takes us on an excursion in the demilitarized boarder area between South Korea and North Korea. Thrilling computer-animated sequences capture his view of a dangerous journey through a mined paradise. Beauty and horror meet here and make us aware of the ambivalence of outer and inner limits.

ZONTA Prize – 1,000 Euros

Eleganssi (Elegance) by Virpi Suutari, Finland 2015, 25′

Eleganssi

Eleganssi

Statement:
The filmmaker portrays a closed society of men with ancient traditions, sophisticated rituals and strict values. The elegance of the film allows us as yet unseen views of the patriarchal world of the economic elite.

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Awards of the German Competition – Members: Athanasios Karanikolas (Berlin), Doris Kuhn (Munich), Florian Keller (Winterthur)

Prize for the best contribution to the German Competition – 5,000 Euros

SHE WHOSE BLOOD IS CLOTTING IN MY UNDERWEAR by Vika Kirchenbauer, Germany 2016, 3′

She

She Whose Blood Is Clotting In My Underwear

Statement:
This film is loud and intimate. It is brutal and tender. A theoretically sophisticated, exquisitely sensual concept video. We distinguish a film that does not just show the violence of lust but literally transfers it to its audience precisely through its experimental distortion – an investigation of identity whose physicality had a visceral effect on us.

3sat Promotional Award – 2,500 Euros

Telefon Santrali by Sarah Drath, Germany 2016, 7′

Telefon Satrali

Telefon Satrali

Statement:
A room that functions like a switchboard: between the past and present, between progress and regression. We distinguish a film that creates glamorous images on a tight budget. And a director who examines a foreign country not from the comfortable exterior perspective but from the angle of its history. Devoid of exotism, ambiguous in its political comment. Even the Internet drops by for a joke.

Special Mention

Sites by Volker Schreiner, Germany 2015, 8′

Statement:
An awesome film because it shows us that you can find orientation in the dark, in art and nature and among skewed perspectives. It keeps surprising us even when it’s over: it used Found Footage.

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Awards of the NRW Competition – Members: Florian Deterding (Düsseldorf), Sylke Gottlebe (Dresden), Andreas Heidenreich (Darmstadt)

Prize for the best contribution to the NRW Competition – 1,000 Euros

Ocean Hill Drive by Miriam Gossing, Lina Sieckmann, Germany 2016, 21′

Statement:
This intensely atmospheric film develops a drawing power that is finely balanced between the surrealist and the documentary. The filmmakers trust in the expressiveness of their images, which are subtly linked to the level of sound. Impressed by the rigorousness with which Miriam Gossing and Lina Sieckmann have refined their artistic style, the jury awards the prize for the best contribution in the NRW Competition to Ocean Hill Drive.

Promotional Award of the NRW Competition – 500 Euros

Das Leben ist hart by Simon Schnellmann, Germany 2015, 3′

Statement:
Not a line too much, not a punch line too little – minimalist, condensed and ingenious, this filmmaker cuts to the chase.

Prize of the West ART Audience Jury  750 Euros

Ein Aus Weg (Loophole) by Simon Steinhorst, Hannah Lotte Stragholz, Germany 2016, 20′

Statement:
It’s never boring. It’s exciting. It’s true to life. It’s authentic. And it employs a variety of cinematic means. In short, it meets all our requirements for a film to captivate us and immerse us in an unknown new world.
The animated documentary Ein Aus Weg by Simon Steinhorst and Hannah Lotte Stragholz takes 20 minutes to introduce the young convict Alex K. who asks himself questions about the meaning of life in interviews with writer and pastor Max Prost. We listen to his tales with fascination – tales of the life of a petty criminal between prison and freedom, life in ordinary society and theft, love and drugs. While Alex K. looks towards the future with a certain degree of optimism, chief inspector Werner B. soberly talks about the German judiciary system and his daily life as a policeman. His forecast for Alex’s future: he’ll commit another crime in nine months or less. He bets an ice cream cone on this. Colourful images animated by hand, editing, sound design, music, script and the authentic story of Alex K. – we, the West ART audience jury, commend the coherent, well-executed and compelling composition of these diverse element and are glad that chief inspector Werner K. has by now lost his bet.

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Awards of the 39th Children’s and Youth Film Competition
Prize of the Children’s Jury – 1,000 Euros – Members: Aleyna Aydin, Allan Burfeind, Emre Gökoglu, Nailany Weimer, Henrike Wilhelm

Hugo Bumfeldt by Éva Katinka Bognár, Hungary 2015, 12′

Hugo Bumfeldt

Hugo Bumfeldt

Statement:
It was hard for us to decide who will get the prize of the 39th international children’s film competition, that’s true – but there is one film that convinced us all from the start. It tells a tale of friendship, homesickness and grief. And of aliens who keep divers as pets instead of goldfish. The characters are colourful and unusual, the story is exciting, funny and also touching; sound and music are awesome. In addition, the film makes us think about how to treat other living creatures.

evo Promotional Award of the Children’s Jury – 1,000 Euros

Novembre by Marjolaine Perreten, France/Switzerland 2015, 4′

Novembre

Novembre

Statement:
We award the evo Promotional Award to a film that is sure to put a small or big smile on every viewer’s face. It is simple, but beautifully animated. Its colours and forms create a very special mood which makes grey sky and rain look like they might pass eventually. And that’s true, after all – and until then, we have to help each other and not take the fat drops too seriously.

Special Mention:

Boy-Razor by Peter Pontikis, Sweden 2015, 11′

Statement:
We award a special mention to a film that captivated us from the very first second. The exciting story and the young actors are simply amazing. We particularly enjoyed the colours and the camera action. Even if all ends well, this film shows that gut decisions made in anger are rarely the ones that feel good.
Prize of the Guest Jury of the International Children’s Film Festival Filem’on, Brussels

Bounce by D.C. Barclay/Rory Lowe, Great Britain 2015, 10 min. 19 sec., DCP, colour

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Prize of the Youth Jury – 1,000 Euros – Members: Maria Eduarda Barbosa, Natalie Mengede, Finn Rubin, Anne Schulzki, Nasstassja Twumasi

Viaduc by Patrice Laliberté, Canada 2015, 19′

Viaduc

Viaduc

Statement:
The prize of the international youth film competition goes to a film that is equally exciting and profound. We were impressed by the use of music and the cinematography, since they both help to transform thrilling scenes into real highlights. The film inspires us to look behind the facades of actions and attitudes and to question our prejudices. We want to draw particular attention to the diversity of subjects addressed by the film: family and loss, speechlessness. Every rupture can be seen as an opportunity to build bridges seems to be one of its messages. Intimate family relations are put into a context of political themes like war and patriotism.

Special Mention:

Pieniä kömpelöitä hellyydenosoituksia (Clumsy Little Acts of Tenderness) by Mila Tervo, Finland 2015, 8′

Statement:
We want to award the special mention of the international youth film competition to a film whose charm and wit convinced us. Embarrassments and misunderstanding that can happen in a daughter-father-relationship are shown in such an ironic and over-the-top way that they fascinate all age groups, without neglecting the serious aspects of these gender and generation relationships.
Certificate of the Ecumenical Jury for a film in the International Children’s and Youth Film Competition
in connection with a recommendation for Matthias Film and Katholisches Filmwerk to buy the film for their catalogues

Viaduc by Patrice Laliberté, Canada 2015, 19′

Statement:
17 year old Mathieu is out one night to spray a graffiti on a highway bridge. The reason for his action won’t be revealed until the end of an exciting film that shows in various ways the lifestyle of young people. Viaduc inspires the viewer to question own prejudices as well as superficial points of view.